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Frequently Asked Questions

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What is the class size?

What is the format of classes?

Are classes one semester or two?

How are the classes graded?

Are all lectures recorded? 

What are the exams like?

How many students are assigned per cadaver in the gross anatomy lab?

How many students participate in service learning projects?

Where do students study?

Is there a dedicated medical library on campus?

For those students that work in research labs, can they publish their findings?

For students working on a second degree, how do they handle the workload?

How do students find housing in Bloomington?

How do students find resources for diversity issues?

 

What is the class size?

We are to have 36 students in years 1 and 2 and 8 students in years 3 and 4.

 

What is the format of classes?

Our classes have a mix of pedagogical styles depending on the instructor and whether the class is one semester or two.  Some one-semester courses are predominantly lecture based.  Many classes use an audience response system, quizzes or other active-learning exercise; other classes combine lecture, on-line modules, TBLs and PBLs.  Some TBLs are class specific but others integrate materials from several courses.

 

Are classes one semester or two?

In the first year, gross anatomy, biochemistry, physiology and the Patient/Physician Relationship (our Introduction to Clinical Medicine course) are spread over two semesters with one grade assigned after the spring semester, whereas histology/cell biology and microbiology/immunology in the fall semester and neuroscience in the spring semester are one-semester courses.  In the second year, medicine, pathology and pharmacology are spread over the two semesters, whereas medical genetics is in the fall semester.  In year 3, the longitudinal integrated clerkship model spreads the clerkships over a year.  This permits longitudinal following of patients and allows integration of the clinical knowledge base and skills for all clerkships.  Fourth year required courses must be taken in Bloomington, whereas electives may be taken in Bloomington or at approved sites around the world.

 

How are the classes graded?

We use the Honors, High Pass, Pass, Fail scale for all of our courses except for the Patient Physician Relationship course, which is graded pass-fail.

 

Are all lectures recorded? 

Generally, lectures are recorded and converted into IPOD format and posted on Oncourse where students can access them.

 

What are the exams like?

Exam style varies from Choose the One Best Answer (national board format), to short answer, to problems to essays.  Classes use a mixture of formats as appropriate to the didactic material.  All classes use the NBME shelf exams for their final exams.  In our medicine courses, we also use simulation encounters and standardized patients to assess student learning.

 

How many students are assigned per cadaver in the gross anatomy lab?

We prefer four students per cadaver, but sometimes we must have five.

 

How many students participate in service learning projects?

Some projects have only a few students, whereas others are enjoyed by many students.  Thus, it depends on matching student interest with the project.  We are always looking to add opportunities, so ideas and energy to implement them are always appreciated.

 

Where do students study?

Most of the curriculum for the first two years is based in Jordan Hall on the IUB campus. Our facilities include a number of rooms that are available for study and for which students have keys or combinations.  These rooms are restricted to medical student use only.  In addition, students have access to available study areas throughout the IUB campus.  At IU Health Bloomington Hospital, the classrooms and some examining rooms are available to our students.

 

Is there a dedicated medical library on campus?

The Life Sciences Library in Jordan Hall includes the medical, nursing and life sciences collections and is open to all students, faculty and staff on the campus.  The medical library at IU Health Bloomington Hospital, the library is open to our students as well.

 

For those students that work in research labs, can they publish their findings?

Each faculty mentor has the goal of publishing their work.  But for students spending only a short time in research, publishing will depend on the quantity of data gathered, how those data fit into the work as a whole, and the nature of the intended journal for publication.  Most students will find their work to be included with other data for a bigger story.

 

For students working on a second degree, how do they handle the workload?

There are a number of ways combined degree candidates adjust to the workload.  One example is to simply complete the first two years of medical school classes and take the Step 1exam before working in earnest on your second degree.  This is best for subjects that are outside of medicine. A second example is for students of anatomy or physiology who would complete the first year of medical school and then complete their second degree program requirements.  It is also possible to take a lower course load for the first few years working on their second degree course and research requirements, and then begin medical school upon completion of the second degree.  Variations of these examples have also been acceptable.

 

How do students find housing in Bloomington?

On-campus housing is available through http://www.rps.indiana.edu/index.cfml and this includes apartments as well as dorm style living.  Off campus housing is extensive and located throughout the city.  We will be working on a much abbreviated listing of housing used by current students. Please note there are more options.

 

CLICK HERE - to see Current students thoughts on some of the available housing in the Bloomington Area.

 

 

How do students find resources for diversity issues?

The campus website is a good place to begin, http://www.indiana.edu/~dema/, to determine what campus resources are available. 

 

 

 

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